Women’s History Month

To celebrate International Women’s Day this week – and Women’s History Month all month – I’ve put together a list of some of my favorite picture books, chapter books, graphic novels, and nonfiction books with women and girls as the main character. Damsels in distress need not apply: whether it’s taking on a fire-breathing dragon, acting in a school play, or solving a mystery, these smart, determined girls tackle their own problems. It was too hard to narrow down nonfiction titles about individual women, so I’ve also included some great collective biographies about awesome women throughout history. This is only a drop in the bucket of all the great books about girls out there, so feel free to stop by the Children’s Desk to get some further recommendations!

 

PICTURE BOOKS
The Paper Bag Princess by Robert Munsch
The Princess and the Pony by Kate Beaton
Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman
Ada Twist, Scientist by Andrea Beaty
Lola at the Library by Anna McQuinn
The Name Jar by Xangsook Choi
I Like Myself by Karen Beaumont
Waiting for the Biblioburro by Monica Brown
My Brave Year of Firsts by Jamie Lee Curtis
The Other Side by Jacqueline Woodson

 

CHAPTER BOOKS
Franny K Stein: Lunch Walks Among Us by Jim Benton
Rain Reign by Ann M. Martin
Three Times Lucky by Sheila Turnage
Flora and Ulysses by Kate DiCamillo
The Case of the Missing Marquess by Nancy Springer
The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill
Savvy by Ingrid Law
Princess in Black by Shannon Hale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
The Serpent’s Secret by Sayantani DasGupta

 

GRAPHIC NOVELS
Sanity and Tallulah by Molly Brooks
Princeless by Jeremy Whitley
Rapunzel’s Revenge by Shannon Hale
Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson
Zita the Spacegirl by Ben Hatke
Sunny Side Up by Jennifer Holm
Real Friends by Shannon Hale
Baby-Sitters Club: Kristy’s Great Idea by Raina Telgemeier
Cleopatra in Space by Mike Maihack
Lunch Lady and the Cyborg Substitute by Jarrett Krosoczka

 

NONFICTION
Girls Think of Everything by  Catherine Thimmish
Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers who Changed the World by Rachel Ignotofsky
Shaking Things Up by Susan Hood
She Persisted and She Persisted Around the World by Chelsea Clinton
Women Who Dared by Linda Skeers

FURTHER RESOURCES
A Mighty Girl
National Women’s History Project
National Women’s History Museum
Women’s History Month

Miss Jessica

Advertisements

Celebrating Black History Month

February is Black History Month.  Here are a few fantastic books you can check out at MPL to appreciate African-American authors and stories throughout the year.

Mama Africa! : how Miriam Makeba spread hope with her song by Kathryn Erskine; illustrations by Charly Palmer

The big bed  by Bunmi Laditan; pictures by Tom Knight

Dragons in a bag [sound recording] by Zetta Elliott

Young, gifted and black : meet 52 black heroes from past and present words by Jamia Wilson; illustrated by Andrea Pippins

Thank you, Omu! by Oge Mora

The Stars Beneath our Feet by David Barclay Moore

Shaking things up : 14 young women who changed the world by Susan Hood

Radiant child : the story of young artist Jean-Michel Basquiat by Javaka Steptoe

My hair is a garden written and illustrated by Cozbi A. Cabrera

Mommy’s khimar by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow; illustrated by Ebony Glenn

Memphis, Martin, and the mountaintop : the sanitation strike of 1968 by Alice Faye Duncan; illustrated by R. Gregory Christie

Little leaders : bold women in black history by Vashti Harrison

Black Girl Magic by Mahogany L. Browne; art by Jess X. Snow

If you want to learn more, the Brown Bookshelf is a nice resource for selecting works featuring Black voices.  During February, the contributors will highlight a different children’s author every day.

The Coretta Scott King Award is given each year to authors and illustrators whose books celebrate African-American culture and human values.  Check out the CSK award blog to find children’s books by African-American authors and illustrators.

We Need Diverse Books is a great website for learning more about the importance of diversity in children’s literature and finding new authors.

Miss Tess