Booktalking to 3rd Graders

If you’ve got a third grade child in the Moline-Coal Valley School District No. 40, ask your child if their library class at school has had any visitors lately?

Our children’s department staff has been visiting all the 3rd grade library classes the past couple of weeks. Our objective has been to booktalk some new books, talk about what’s happening in the public library, and hand out library card application forms.

Booktalks are short, informal presentations designed to inspire others to read the same book – we essentially are trying to “sell you” on reading that book!  “Booktalking” is one of the most effective ways to get kids reading, and we’ve had a blast talking to and with these terrific kids!

Here’s a list of what Miss Teresa was “selling” in her booktalks!

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Anne of Green Gables: a Graphic Novel adapted by Mariah Marsden

The Boxcar Children – Fully Illustrated Edition by Gertrude Chandler Warner

The Purloining of Prince Oleomargarine by Mark Twain and Philip Stead

Bad Kitty – Camp Daze by Nick Bruel

The Secret Cookie Club: P.S. Send More Cookies by Martha Freeman

Hilo – The Boy Who Crashed to Earth by Judd Winick

How To Be An Elephant – Growing Up in the African Wild by Katherine Roy

Her Right Foot by Dave Eggers

Dog Man and Cat Kid by Dav Pilkey

Not So Different – What You Really Want to Ask About Having a Disability by Shane Burcaw

Ruth Bader Ginsburg – The Case of RBG vs. Inequality by Jonah Winter

Big Nate – Thunka, Thunka, Thunka by Lincoln Peirce

Miss Teresa

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Fun Music for Kids

I love to incorporate music into my story time sessions, and I think it’s very popular with our attendees, too. Parents, grandparents, and caregivers often tell me their child “has been singing that song all week!”  We know music is fun, but are there other reasons to include music into play?

According to a 2014 article in School Library Journal,  the answer is yes!

The author of that article, Sarah Bayliss, reports that “A growing body of research is affirming the central role of music in early literacy. Librarians are listening—and designing programs with a deep mindfulness of how music supports PreK–learning. Music has been proven to do everything from boosting numeracy to developing empathy among children; from improving speech-language delays to augmenting comprehension. One study from the Music-Science Lab at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev showed that young children who played hand-clapping games had better cognitive and social skills than those who didn’t.”

The article goes on to detail other reasons to include music in programming, complete with online music links, artists and CD’s kids love, and academic resources.  While I found the author’s suggestions to include some fantastic resources, many of which I use, I thought it might be fun to let you know what three of my favorite children’s musicians are! So, in no particular order, here they are, complete with links to our library catalog and YouTube videos as well!

Laurie Berkner

Whaddaya Think of That?

On this album is her famous “I Know a Chicken” song, AKA the Shaky Egg song from storytime!  Pick up any album by Laurie Berkner for a fun time. Or, connect with her via YouTube and sing along to “We Are the Dinosaurs”.  While you’re at it, she also has picture books that you can read and sing along with, such as Pillowland

Jim Gill

Jim Gill Makes It Noisy in Boise, Idaho

My favorite storytime song on this album is “List of Dances” – it’s a list that is sixteen dances long!  Kids have a great time following along with this one, and after going through all 16, Jim Gill sings that it would be fun to do them again, this time from the bottom to the top.    Click on this link to watch him in concert!  By the way, we are very excited to let you in on a secret ….. Jim Gill will be doing a concert here at the Moline Public Library this summer!  Details coming soon!

Greg and Steve

My all-time favorite song on this album is “The Freeze”.  Click here to listen! I think I like these guys because they’ve been entertaining kids since the late 70’s and early 80’s, but they are still going strong and still relevant!

I hope you check out some of  these kids artists, and if you ever need any other music ideas, just ask one of us in the Children’s Department for suggestions!

Miss Teresa

There’s a Book for That!

From ASHA.org There’s a Book for That

There’s a Book for That! is a really good read on the importance of reading with your child to promote their language and literacy development! Written by a speech pathologist, this article has great talking points across specialties and job titles and should interest all parents as well! This article originally appeared in:

The ASHA Leader, December 2017, Vol. 22, 34-35. doi:10.1044/leader.SCM.22122017.34

 

 

Miss Teresa

Picture Book Biographies

Picture book biographies.

Did you know such a thing existed?

Many people do not realize that these books do exist. They are wonderful way to introduce the lives of famous and/or important people to young people.

The first picture book biography I read was the Day-Glo Brothers. It is the story of two brothers and how Day-Glo colors were invented. I learned something new and was entertained by the drawings in the book.

We have a list of some of the picture book biographies we own. Just ask at the Children’s Desk and we will be glad to help you find one.

Miss Sarah

Nursery Rhymes and Songs

Thanksgiving is right around the corner. People are gathered together. There’s lots of food, and talking. Unfortunately, your toddler is not happy and ready for a meltdown. It may be because of the obvious hungry, tired and diaper needs changing, or simple overload from so many people and being ignored.

If your usual trick of distraction doesn’t work, try a nursery rhyme or two. I’ve had enormous success with singing the Itsy Bitsy Spider with many children. Of course it may be that having a stranger waving her hands and croaking out a tune is  so alien to the child they stop crying in amazement. Or, it may be that a familiar tune has a calming effect and someone else is paying attention to them.

In any case, carrying around an action play or song in your mind is a lot easier than carrying around another toy that could easily be left behind. Get the entire family involved. See who remembers the most rhymes and songs from their childhood. If you can’t remember the words, make some up. You may not have noticed that many of the tunes to nursery rhymes are used over and over. Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star for example, uses the same tune as the ABC song.  Getting your little one familiar with the tune, puts your child that much closer to learning their ABC’s.

Nursery rhymes and songs also help teach your young  child to hear the beat and rhythm of language which is linked with  the skill of syllable separation and to help teach prediction. Knowledge of nursery rhymes can also be a strong predictor of later reading success. So sing with gusto with the entire family this Thanksgiving. You’ll be doing both you and your child a favor.

Humpty Dumpty ….. After the Fall

 

So many authors have wondered what happened to Humpty Dumpty after the “great fall”, and they’ve come up with some terrific picture books to entertain that idea! Here are some titles for you and your child to explore.

For our very youngest library customer, we have Humpty Dumpty by Jonas Sicklar. If you are not familiar with the “Indestructibles” books, they are designed for the way babies “read” – with their hands and mouth. This version of Humpty Dumpty has the egg man on the Great Wall of China!

Next up is Humpty Dumpty by Daniel Kirk. After Humpty climbs the proverbial brick wall to get a better look at the young king in his birthday parade, the obvious fall happens, and it’s young King Moe who puts Humpty back together, “like a puzzle”!

In Humpty Dumpty Climbs Again by Dave Horowitz, Humpty’s shell has been fixed, but he’s lost his confidence. The author cleverly inserts other popular nursery rhyme characters in this “eggsistensial tale of hope”.

For beginning readers, check out Humpty’s Fall by Dosh Archer, one of the Urgency Emergency! Early Readers series. In this fun adventure, Humpty arrives at the hospital with a cracked shell and severe yolk seepage …. can the doctors at City Hospital save him?

Two fun picture books by Joe Dumpty (as told to Jeanie Franz Ransom) are What REALLY Happened to Humpty? and The Crown Affair (both are from the files of a hard-boiled detective! These stories take place in Mother Gooseland, so you’ll be sure to see some of your favorite characters making an appearance.

We have a series of picture books called Flip-Side Rhymes, where half-way through the book, you must flip the book to get another side of the rhyme. By Christopher Harbo, you may not want to read this Humpty Dumpty version if you are appalled by the ending … [SPOILER ALERT!!!] … poor Humpty gets scrambled and eaten!

Bob Graham tells the story of Humpty’s little sister in Dimity Dumpty. The author believes that Humpty’s notoriety for not doing much at all (basically just falling off a wall!) was not very clever, so he’s telling the story of his little sister, who was quite the heroine.

In Ode to Humpty Dumpty by Harriet Ziefert, the author blends the traditional rhyme with new characters. The whole book is done in rhyme, which makes it fun and playful.

And finally, the book that inspired the title of this post, is After the Fall – How Humpty Dumpty Got Back Up Again by Caldecott Medal winner Dan Santat. From the book jacket: “Inspiring and unforgettable, this epilogue to the beloved classic nursery rhyme will encourage even the most afraid to overcome their fears, learn to get back up – and reach new heights”.

Miss Teresa