Fortnite Books

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With its combination of the excitement of shooters and the creativity and construction of sandbox games like Minecraft, Fortnite has taken the video game world by storm and it doesn’t seem like its popularity is letting up anytime soon. These books full of tips and tricks will help readers become the last one standing in the Battle Royale, plus an art book if they want to learn how to draw their favorite characters.

 

 

Fortnite Battle Royale Hacks : Advanced Strategies – Jason R. Rich

Fortnite Battle Royale Hacks : Secrets of the Island – Jason R. Rich

Fortnite Battle Royale Hacks : The Unofficial Gamer’s Guide – Jason R. Rich

Fortnite Battle Royale Hacks : Building Strategies – Jason R. Rich

The Fortnite Guide to Staying Alive: Tips and Tricks for Every Kind of Player – Damien Kuhn

Official Fortnite Battle Royale Survival Guide

Unofficial How to Draw Fortnite for Kids : Learn to Draw 40 of Your Favorite Fortnite Heroes by Andrew Howell

An Encyclopedia of Strategy for Fortniters : An Unofficial Guide for Battle Royale – Jason R. Rich

An Unofficial Encyclopedia of Strategy for Fortniters : ATK Driving Techniques, Challenges, and Stunts – Jason R. Rich

Miss Jessica

 

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Spooky Series!

There’s something about summertime that always puts me in the mood for spooky stories. Maybe I’m just gearing up for autumn and Halloween early? Or maybe it’s the rolling thunder and cracks of lightning during summer storms that remind me of mad scientists and haunted houses. If you’re also looking for some beach reads that tend towards the spooky and spine-chilling, then any of these series are sure to satisfy your kiddo for awhile. These short, illustrated chapter books are perfect for those who are just branching out into chapter books on their own. All of the links go to the first book in the series.

 

Ghost Detectors – Dotti Enderle

Monster Hunters – Jan Fields

Graveyard Diaries – Baron Specter

Eerie Elementary – Jack Chabert

The Notebook of Doom – Troy Cummings

Lucky 8 – Lea Taddonio

A Deadly Fall – Rich Wallace

Scream Street – Tommy Donbavand

Ursula’s Funland – Johanna Gohmann

Miss Jessica

 

Review: Sanity & Tallulah by Molly Brooks

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Summary: 

I usually add the publisher’s description here, but in my opinion it doesn’t do this book justice, so we’re doing things my way today! This graphic novel is the story of best friends Sanity and Tallulah, who live on the space station Wilnick. Sanity loves to do science experiments and creates an adorable – and huge – three-headed kitten named Princess Sparkle, Destroyer of Worlds. But when Princess Sparkle, Destroyer of Worlds gets loose on the station, Sanity and Tallulah have to track her down before security makes them give her up. Meanwhile, unexplained power outages all across the station have everyone in a panic, and if they don’t figure out what’s causing it soon, the whole station could blow up! Will Sanity and Tallulah be able to save Princess Sparkle and the day? 

Review: 

I just finished reading this book myself not too long ago and have been trying to convince everyone I know to read it since then. Sanity and Tallulah is a super fun scifi adventure with a diverse cast of characters. Between the hunt for Princess Sparkle, Destroyer of Worlds, and the mysterious power failures on the station there is plenty of action. The art is fun and eye-catching without falling into the boring, monochromatic silvery palate a lot of futuristic media does, and the writing is similarly breezy and enjoyable. The science itself is mostly of the made-up, “reverse the polarity of the neutron flow” variety, but I really liked that it shows women and girls with an interest in STEM. Sanity herself is a budding scientist smart enough to create Princess Sparkle, Destroyer of Worlds solo and Tallulah’s mom is the engineer in charge on Wilnick. 

With the sequel coming out this fall, now is a great time to read Sanity and Tallulah! Recommended for ages 8 – 12.

Check it out on the catalog here!

Miss Jessica

Five On Friday: June

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It’s June, and that means it’s time for Summer Reading! Our theme this year is It’s Showtime at Your Library, so I decided to borrow the showtime theme for this month’s Five on Friday. Here are five middle grade books all about the theater for the superstar in you.

 

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Better Nate than Ever by Tim Federle

Nate Foster has big dreams. His whole life, he’s wanted to star in a Broadway show. (Heck, he’d settle for seeing a Broadway show.) But how is Nate supposed to make his dreams come true when he’s stuck in Jankburg, Pennsylvania, where no one (except his best pal Libby) appreciates a good show tune? With Libby’s help, Nate plans a daring overnight escape to New York. There’s an open casting call for E.T.: The Musical, and Nate knows this could be the difference between small-town blues and big-time stardom.

 

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Drama by Raina Telgemeier

Callie loves theater. And while she would totally try out for her middle school’s production of Moon Over Mississippi, she can’t really sing. Instead she’s the set designer for the drama department stage crew, and this year she’s determined to create a set worthy of Broadway on a middle-school budget. But how can she, when she doesn’t know much about carpentry, ticket sales are down, and the crew members are having trouble working together? Not to mention the onstage AND offstage drama that occurs once the actors are chosen. And when two cute brothers enter the picture, things get even crazier!

 

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The Marvels by Brian Selznick

The journey begins at sea in 1766, with a boy named Billy Marvel. After surviving a shipwreck, he finds work in a London theatre. There, his family flourishes for generations as brilliant actors until 1900, when young Leontes Marvel is banished from the stage. Nearly a century later, runaway Joseph Jervis seeks refuge with an uncle in London. Albert Nightingale’s strange, beautiful house, with its mysterious portraits and ghostly presences, captivates Joseph and leads him on a search for clues about the house, his family, and the past.

 

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Summerlost by Ally Condie

It’s the first summer since the devastating accident that killed Cedar’s father and younger brother, Ben. But now Cedar and what’s left of her family are returning to the town of Iron Creek for the summer. They’re just settling into their new house when a boy named Leo, dressed in costume, rides by on his bike. Intrigued, Cedar follows him to the renowned Summerlost theatre festival. Soon, she not only has a new friend in Leo and a job working concessions at the festival, she finds herself surrounded by mystery.

 

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How to Stage a Catastrophe by Rebecca Donnelly

Sidney plans to be the director of the Juicebox Theater when he grows up. For now, he handles the props, his best friend Folly works the concession stand, and his sister May hangs out in the spotlight. But the theater is in danger of closing, and the kids know they need a plan to save it and fast. When they join a local commerce club to earn money, Sid and Folly uncover some immoral business practices, and it gives them a great idea for saving the theater. That is, if you can call extortion a great idea.

And that’s all for this month! Be sure to check back in July, same bat time, same bat channel for the next 5 on Friday.

Miss Jessica

 

Review: Sal and Gabi Break the Universe by Carlos Hernandez

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Summary:

From the publisher: How did a raw chicken get inside Yasmany’s locker? When Sal Vidon meets Gabi Real for the first time, it isn’t under the best of circumstances. Sal is in the principal’s office for the third time in three days, and it’s still the first week of school. Gabi, student council president and editor of the school paper, is there to support her friend Yasmany, who just picked a fight with Sal. She is determined to prove that somehow, Sal planted a raw chicken in Yasmany’s locker, even though nobody saw him do it and the bloody poultry has since mysteriously disappeared. Sal prides himself on being an excellent magician, but for this sleight of hand, he relied on a talent no one would guess . . . except maybe Gabi, whose sharp eyes never miss a trick. When Gabi learns that he’s capable of conjuring things much bigger than a chicken–including his dead mother–and she takes it all in stride, Sal knows that she is someone he can work with. There’s only one slight problem: their manipulation of time and space could put the entire universe at risk. A sassy entropy sweeper, a documentary about wedgies, a principal who wears a Venetian bauta mask, and heaping platefuls of Cuban food are just some of the delights that await in his mind-blowing novel gift-wrapped in love and laughter.

Review:

You ever read a book so good that once you finish it, you hug it and thank it for its existence like some kind of nerdy version of KonMari? That is exactly what I did after finishing Carlos Hernandez’s middle grade debut, Sal and Gabi Break the Universe. Sal is one of the most delightful and charming protagonists I’ve read in a long time, and even though the scifi part of the plot wasn’t as significant as I had expected, it never dragged because I loved Hernandez’s style so much. Filled with heart and humor, this is a story about love and grief and friendship without ever getting preachy. The publisher suggested ages are 8 to 12, but I think kids on the older end of that range and even into young adult readers would better appreciate it. Highly, highly recommended.

 

Check it out on the catalog here!

Miss Jessica

Caterpillars and Butterflies Booklist

We’re crazy for caterpillars lately! The caterpillars we’ve been raising have been getting bigger every day. If you haven’t stopped in to check them out, you’re missing out! It’s pretty fun to see them crawling around and chowing down on their food. Here are some fun books about caterpillars and butterflies to share with your little ones.

Pete the Cat and the Cool Caterpillar by James Dean

Butterfly Birthday by Harriet Ziefert

The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

Gotta Go, Gotta Go! by Sam Swope

In My Flower by Sara Gillingham

Life Cycle of a Butterfly by Karen Kenney

Caterpillars by Claire Llewellyn 

Butterflies by Nic Bishop

Love from the Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

Butterflies by Thea Feldman

How a Caterpillar Grows into a Butterfly by Tanya Kant

10 Little Caterpillars by Bill Martin, Jr.

The Prince of Butterflies by Bruce Coville

Little Bear and the Butterflies by Susan Quinn

10 Magic Butterflies by Danica McKellar

Waiting for Wings by Lois Ehlert

Miss Jessica

5 on Friday: May

Five on Friday

For this month’s Five on Friday, I’ve put together 5 articles about kids’ books and literacy that I found interesting. I hope you do too!

  1. Why do we read sad books? Are sad books helpful for kids? Author Jo Knowles’ article has a really interesting take on the purpose and value of sad books for kids here.
  2. Any children’s librarian will tell you the importance of reading to your child. But don’t just take it from us – a recent study found that kids who are read one short book per day start kindergarten knowing 290,000 more words than kids whose parents didn’t read to them. If you increase the number of books to five per day, the difference in vocabulary bumps up to 1.4 million words. Wow! Read more on why you should read to your kids here.
  3. I remember reading Richard Scarry books when I was a kid, and it makes me smile to see they are still around today. But they’re not the exact same books as they were when I was young, because Scarry has been subtly updating them to better reflect changing values in society. How cool! Check out some of the altered pictures here.
  4. To celebrate the 100th anniversary of Children’s Book Week, the Library of Congress has put 67 classic children’s books online! Their news release states that “From Humpty Dumpty to Little Red Riding Hood, the books in this collection were published in the United States and England before 1924, are no longer under copyright, and are free to read and share.” So why not head over to the School Library Journal article covering it and check it out?
  5. Speaking of books I grew up on, Baby-sitters Club was another series I remember enjoying. With Raina Telgemeier’s graphic novel adaptation, they’ve come back into popularity. Riding on the wave of sudden relevance, Elle Fanning and others are recording audiobooks for the entire 131-book series.

And that’s all for this month! Be sure to check back in June, same bat time, same bat channel for the next 5 on Friday.

Miss Jessica